Te Mana Whakamaru Tamariki Motuhake or the Independent Children’s Monitor was formally established on 1 July 2019 to monitor agency compliance with the NCS Regulations. The NCS Regulations
(National Care Standards and Related Matters) Regulations 2018 View the full glossary
set out the standard of care every child and young person needs to do well and be well, and the support all caregivers can expect to receive. They came into effect on 1 July 2019. We monitor four agencies that have children in their custody. 

The Oranga Tamariki system encompasses all agencies that provide services to children and young people under, or operating in connection with, the Oranga Tamariki Act 1989. The Act includes health, education, police, and disability services, as well as NGOs
Non-government organisationsView the full glossary
, among others.

We engage with several agencies for the purposes of monitoring. We monitor the compliance of the four agencies with custody of children – Barnardos, Dingwall Trust, Open Home Foundation and Oranga Tamariki, by utilising the information gathered during monitoring visits as well as requesting information from them directly on their own self-monitoring processes.

You can read more about our origins here.

Underpinning our work are our principles of being child-centred (within the context of their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
) and having te ao Māori
The Māori worldView the full glossary
focus across all that we do. Below are our core values that influence how we engage with each other and those we work with.

Kia Māia – Courageous

We are brave, bold, capable and confident. This means we:

  • stand up for what is right
  • tell the truth, even when it isn’t popular.

Manaaki – Respectful

We show respect and care for others. This means we:

  • respect diversity of thought, action, and culture
  • have a child-centred and te ao Māori perspective woven throughout our work
  • look out for each other and make work a safe place for our colleagues.

Kia Pono, Kia Tika – Trustworthy

We are honest and genuine and do the right thing. This means we:

  • admit when we don’t know the answer
  • cross-check our data 
  • do what we say we will and communicate in a timely manner if we can’t.

Kia Huritao – Reflective

We are considered and reflective. This means we:

  • learn from experience, value feedback, and always look for opportunities to improve
  • take the necessary time to make the best decisions we can
  • never assume we know what is best.

 

Our tikanga
Correct procedure, the customary system of values and practices that have developed over time and are deeply embedded in the social context View the full glossary
approach lays a sound foundation for us to work with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
and rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, and those who hold their best interests at heart their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
, hapū
Sub-tribeView the full glossary
, iwi
TribeView the full glossary
and communities.

We focus on building relationships that are respectful and trustworthy, reciprocal, with a common focus. Our proactive engagement, along with effective processes for talking, learning and working together, contributes to successful conversations.

We do not work in isolation. Key to our success is engaging and partnering with Māori and those who work within or experience the Oranga Tamariki system. We strive to be inclusive, encompassing the diversity of culture, identity and ethnicity of all participants in the care system.

We continue to strengthen the relationships we built during the engagement with communities in mid-2019. Our work is further supported and guided by Te Kāhui
To flock, to herd, to cluster and so denotes a groupView the full glossary
.

We are a growing organisation and have four monitoring teams: one in our national office in Whanganui-ā-Tara
WellingtonView the full glossary
, two in Tāmaki Makaurau
AucklandView the full glossary
and one in Ōtautahi
ChristchurchView the full glossary
. Each of these teams have up to five monitors with support from practice leads and team coordinators. We also have a data and insights team to prepare and support our monitoring, analysis of information after visits and the data provided by monitored agencies.

Our monitors come from a range of backgrounds and areas of expertise including social work, psychology, education and law. They are trained in listening and speaking with children and young people and have experience in working with different communities, including Māori communities.

Our work is also supported by operational policy, communications, and service design advisors, who constantly evaluate our end-to-end monitoring cycle and ensure timely communications to our stakeholders.

 

Arran Jones is the Executive Director. Arran has been with the Monitor since April 2020. He has a legal background, having spent over ten years working in the Ministry of Social Development’s Legal Service both as senior solicitor and Deputy Chief Legal Advisor leading operational and corporate teams. He has held several leadership roles at the Ministry of Social Development including in the Office of the Chief Executive, Legal Services and at Work and Income. More recently he was Head of Privacy at ACC. He also led the Partnerships and Programmes workstream in the Investing in Children programme that established Oranga Tamariki.

“My vision for the Monitor is to listen to many voices, most importantly of children, young people and their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
 . I believe this is how we can provide the greatest support to Oranga Tamariki and other monitored agencies, and ultimately the children and young people in their care.”

 

Nova Banaghan is the Chief Monitor. Nova has been with the Monitor since August 2019. She is a registered Social Worker and has had a 20-year career in the public service, including leadership roles with Child, Youth and Family, the Ministry of Social Development, and the Department of Corrections. Nova’s experience includes working directly with children, tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
 and their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
, as well as several years in senior leadership roles including supporting the Women’s Strategy at the Department of Corrections. Nova has also developed relationships with non-government agencies and iwi
TribeView the full glossary
 , and Māori organisations. She is also on the board of governors for a not-for-profit organisation, supporting children and families of those with a parent in prison.

“Part of the role of the Monitor is to highlight great practice and to be a support to those delivering services. My aim is to see the improvement of the practice and systems, through the influence of the Monitor, to give our children and tamariki in care the best opportunities.”

 

In May 2019, Te Kāhui
To flock, to herd, to cluster and so denotes a groupView the full glossary
, comprising key Māori leaders, was established to help achieve the engagement and collaboration goals for the policy and legislative phase. They play a pivotal role in supporting the monitor by providing advice and support on our monitoring assessment approach and how we work. The members of Te Kāhui have expertise, leadership and mana
Prestige, authority, control, power, influence, status, spiritual power, charismaView the full glossary
in health, justice and social services for Māori.

Donna Matahaere-Atariki (Chair)

Ngāi Te Ruahikihiki, Ngāti Taoka, Te Atawhiua, Taranaki, Te Atiawa

Donna Matahaere-Atariki (MNZM) chairs the Otakou Rūnanga and the Ministry of Health NGO Council. She is also a member of the University of Otago Council, Trustee of Well South Primary Health Network, Alternate for Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu, and a Gambling Commissioner. Donna has also held positions in Oranga Tamariki and Te Puni Kōkiri and been a Whānau Ora coach for Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu Whānau Ora Commission. She is currently the Chair of Otakou Health Ltd and on the Board of the Otago Community Hospice.

 

Tā Mark Solomon

Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Kurī

Tā Mark Wiremu Solomon, (KNZM) is an experienced and respected leader of his hapū
Sub-tribeView the full glossary
, his iwi
TribeView the full glossary
 and the wider New Zealand business community. He has served as a member of his local school board and the board of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, as a trustee of Takahanga Marae in his home kāinga
Address, residence, village, settlement, habitation, habitat, dwellingView the full glossary
of Kaikoura, as Kaiwhakahaere of Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu for nearly 18 years and has been a member of the Canterbury District Health Board.  Tā Mark is currently on the Deep South Science Challenge Board and the Sustainable Seas Science Challenge Board, Deputy Chair of Te Ohu Kaimoana and Chair of the Board for Te Pūtahitanga o Te Waipounamu Whānau Ora Commission.  Tā Mark is a strong advocate for Māori.

 

Druis Barrett

Ngāti Whatua-Ngāpuhi descent and her hapū are Uriroroi and Mahurehure

Druis Barrett (CNZM) has been a previous Commissioner for two Commissions; Training and Employment, and the Gisborne Cervical Screening Cases; was a former National President of the Māori Women’s Welfare League; Trustee of Te Kōhanga Reo National Trust Board; and sits on many government advisory groups. She is passionate and committed to promoting and setting tūturu policy for Māori and for the well-being and development of whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
, hapū and iwi.

 

Katie Murray

Te Rarawa, Te Aupouri, Ngāti Kuri, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Kahu, Ngāi Takoto

Katie Murray (QSM) is the Kai Arahi of Waitomo Papakainga, a whānau-based and focused kaupapa Māori based social service agency in Kaitaia. Waitomo Papakainga supports a wide range of programmes and activities that support whānau in her community. Katie is actively involved in her community of Te Hiku ō Te Ika and has a degree in Social Work. She is a trustee on Te Rūnanga ō Te Rarawa as well as Te Hiku ō Te Ika Iwi Development Trust. Katie is a straight talking, passionate and visionary Māori woman committed to the restoration of tino rangatiratanga for whānau, hapū and iwi.

 

Eugene Ryder

Ngāti Kahu, Ngāti Awa and Tūwharetoa ki Kawerau

Eugene Ryder has over 25 years’ experience working to support marginalised families. His expertise and voluntary work in and alongside gang communities in particular, is exceptional. Eugene was appointed by the Chair of the Royal Commission on the Abuse of Children in State Care as an Ambassador and key contact with networks in the gang and wider community. Eugene has worked alongside various government departments advising and sharing his knowledge and expertise, most notably with the Department of Justice, Department of Corrections, Oranga Tamariki and the Ministry for Social Development.

We have been building our team to enable us to fully meet our monitoring and reporting commitments. Please note that as the Ministry of Social Development has been tasked with establishing the Monitor, all job applications are processed through the Ministry’s recruitment system. We don't have any openings currently.

You can subscribe to our updates to receive notification of new vacancies. 

We have six guiding documents to inform our monitoring work. These documents lay a solid foundation for us to work with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
, rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, and their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
. They ensure our work is guided by a child-centred and whānau-led practice. A commitment to Māori is embedded in our engagement and monitoring approach.

We took an outcomes-based approach and applied a holistic te ao Māori
The Māori worldView the full glossary
focus to support the development of our Outcomes Framework. Our Framework draws upon the Government’s six wellbeing outcomes from the Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy and incorporates key dimensions from the Whānau Ora Outcomes Framework and the Oranga Tamariki Outcomes Framework. It represents our perspective of what matters for tamariki, rangatahi and whānau in the Oranga Tamariki system, now and in the future. We use the Framework to measure how the Oranga Tamariki system enhances wellbeing and life outcomes of tamariki and rangatahi in care, identifying high-performance as well as areas that need improvement.

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