A connector is a broad term we use to describe a person, organisation or agency that can assist us to identify and connect with tamarikirangatahiwhānau or caregivers.

Connectors help tamariki, rangatahi, whānau and caregivers understand who we are and what we are trying to do. This will help people decide whether they want to talk with us. 

If you're interested in helping us connect, find out more below or talk to one of our monitoring staff.

Our role is to provide a credible view of the State care system. We do this by providing independent monitoring, assurance and reporting on the performance of agencies that look after tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
and rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
 (children and young people).

Our main mahi
WorkView the full glossary
(work) is to check that agencies who have custody of tamariki and rangatahi are providing them with the care they need. We also check tamariki and rangatahi are involved in decisions about them and are aware of their rights, including their right to make a complaint.

In other words, we monitor the extent and quality of compliance with the Oranga Tamariki National Care Standards Regulations (2018).

Our mahi is not limited to measuring compliance by reviewing information from agencies. The stories and lived experiences of tamariki and rangatahi, their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
, caregivers and their community are at the centre of our monitoring approach.

We listen to those who experience the care system to help us understand what is working and what needs to change. This includes tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
and rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
and caregivers, and people who
make up the community around tamariki and rangatahi in care – iwi
TribeView the full glossary
hapū
Sub-tribeView the full glossary
, social service providers, kura (schools) and non-government organisations as well as other government agencies.

Our conversations with people across the motū (country) will help us develop a holistic picture of what’s working well and what might be getting in the way

We have thought a lot about how we might connect respectfully, safely and meaningfully with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
, rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
and caregivers within the communities that we visit. It’s important to us
that we hear their voices in the work that we do and that our reporting reflects their experience.

We recognise the value of taking time to build relationships and establish rapport. In order to connect with participants in our mahi
WorkView the full glossary
, we will be relying on organisations who have existing and trusted relationships within communities. We need help to make these connections as we can’t do this alone.

We know that honest kōrero
Conversation or discussionView the full glossary
 (conversations) and information sharing comes out of strong and
trusting relationships.

A connector is a broad term we use to describe a person, organisation or agency that can assist us to identify and connect with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
or caregivers.

Relationships with connectors go beyond being a gateway for our engagement with tamariki and their whānau. Our operational principles of kotahitanga (unity), manaakitanga (caring for others) and whakamana i te tāngata (respect) acknowledges the reciprocal nature of our relationships with connectors.

A connector will help tamariki, rangatahi, whānau and caregivers understand who we are and what we are trying to do. This will help people decide whether they want to talk with us. If people decide they want to talk to us, the connector can also assist us to arrange this.

We are also mindful that on rare occasions tamariki, rangatahi, whānau and caregivers may need support following a visit. Connectors will be best placed to provide direct support or help people access the support they need.

We want to kōrero
Conversation or discussionView the full glossary
with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
, rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
and caregivers. If you work with them, then we would welcome the chance to talk to you about the possibility of you becoming a connector.

Please talk with our monitoring staff or email us if you have any questions or want to know more.

How we support connectors

We acknowledge and value the contribution that connectors make and would be happy to discuss any additional costs that may arise from the support provided. Please discuss this directly with our
monitoring staff.


We will also provide information so that connectors can confidently talk with tamariki, rangatahi, caregivers, and/or whānau about who we are and what we do.

This will include:

  • information sheets for potential participants
  • consent forms for potential participants
  • our Ethics Code
  • our Child Protection Policy
  • guidance about the information we collect, how we collect it and how we care for it in line with our policies.

We look forward to spending time with you and hearing about your experiences so that we provide the best support to those working within the State care system and ultimately, for tamariki and rangatahi in care.

Ngā mihi nui ki a koutou!

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