We talk with a range of people as part of our monitoring. This includes tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
, and caregivers. We also talk with agencies that have tamariki in their custody and other government organisations and community providers including iwi
TribeView the full glossary
and Māori organisations. It’s important that people know who we are, what we want to talk with them about, and how we will use their information.

We have created Ngā Kete
Range of documents and tools developed to help explain to stakeholders what we do, and how we want to talk with peopleView the full glossary
to help explain what we do and how we want to talk with people.

Our Ngā Kete can be used in group or one-to-one hui
Meeting, gatheringView the full glossary
with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
and rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
and caregivers, and provide valuable insights into their lived experience and voice. They include our animation videos, participant information sheets and consent forms.

 

We take an outcomes approach to our monitoring work. We want to understand how well the monitored organisations are meeting their obligations under the NCS Regulations
(National Care Standards and Related Matters) Regulations 2018 View the full glossary
and supporting positive outcomes for tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
and their whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
. We also want to know how the system enables tamariki and whānau to experience positive outcomes. To do this, we have created a series of prompts that guide our kōrero
Conversation or discussionView the full glossary
. The prompts are based on our Outcomes Framework and our Assessment Matrix.

 

A connector is a broad term we use to describe a person, organisation or agency that can assist us to identify and connect with tamariki
Children (plural) aged 0-13 yearsView the full glossary
, rangatahi
Young person aged 14 – 21 years of ageView the full glossary
, whānau
Whānau refers to people who are biologically linked or share whakapapa. For the Monitor’s monitoring purposes, whānau includes parents, whānau members living with tamariki at the point they have come into care View the full glossary
or caregivers. Connectors help tamariki, rangatahi, whānau and caregivers understand who we are and what we are trying to do. This will help people decide whether they want to talk with us. If you are a connector or interested in becoming one, click here.

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